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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
when the president calls for all the new taxes in the fiscal cliff negotiation, mr. president we already have a big tax increase that will hit on january 2nd. that of course is the obamacare taxes. you mentioned one of them, the tax on medical devices and medical equipment, bill, which i agree with, congressman price. that will reduce innovation and will reduce the kind of invention and new products we need to keep people healthier. in addition to that, bill, don't forget there is something called 3.8% investment tax surcharge in the obamacare bill that starts in january. one of the things that the president says is a little misleading i will only raise tax rates back where they were in the clinton era. you heard him say that a lot of times, bill. he is not including that 3.8% investment tax that will raise the taxes higher than they were in the '90s. bill: i see. seeing it right here. if you make more than $200,000. >> that's right. bill: if you're in a household of 250 or above, subject to a new 3.8% tax. well, you know, ultimately republicans argue this is coming down on the b
today. it's over. why inject the politics? why go there? with so much going on, the fiscal cliff, negotiating back and forth with the house trying to figure out how to avoid massive tax increases and spending cuts, why there? it's all politics. >> steve: one other note, the "wall street journal" says regarding right to work states, between 2000 and 2010, 5 million people moved from union states to right to work states and they have 23% higher rate of income growth per capita in right to work states. so things are thriving in the right to work states. there are 24 of them. 26 still are union states. >> gretchen: eric brought up an interesting point about why isn't the president staying in washington, because now it turns out that the fiscal cliff is actually closer than we thought. it was not coakley january 1 anymore. we've about to go off it any day now because apparently it takes a certain amount of days to actually draft any kind of legislation that they might come to an agreement on and so if you backtrack then from the end of the year and when congress is going to be going h
here, forget fiscal cliff, forget negotiations. you just look economically, raise taxes, you don't get all the money you think you are going to bring in. >> brian: real quick, kevin mccarthy, one of the young guns, was on "metropolitan the press" and said, good news. revenues are up 10%. that's because we seem to be turning around economically. here is the bad news, spending is up 16%. why? he's trying to explain to a very reluctant david gregory, why should we consider raising tax when is clearly the revenue is up, but the spending is up higher? >> the president wants to raise tax rates on people making more than 250,000. he thinks that will bring in $82 billion in one year. the experience of california and other countries is that you will not bring in $82 billion. you bring in less. >> brian: sadly, it's just about getting a trophy and saying i told you i would do it. >> that's the politics of it. >> brian: varney and company might want to pick this up at 9:20 eastern time. >> always take your advice. >> brian: i'll put it in writing. >> thank you. >> brian: three minutes before the
that the negotiations to avert the fiscal cliff are successful, in my view we should not wait for a grand bargain in order to finish work on this important tax extender legislation. tax extenders are different from the other fiscal cliff issues for three basic reasons, and let me describe those reasons. first tax extenders are much less contentious than the other end of year problems that we -- that need to be resolved. the tax extender bill on the senate calendar has strong bipartisan support. in august, the finance committee approved it by a large margin. we have support from six republicans, including the ranking member, senator hatch. all 13 democrats supported it. i believe that many more republicans will vote for this legislation if it's brought up for consideration here in the senate. the bill consists entirely of tax cuts. it should not be difficult to get senators to vote for tax cuts, right before christmas especially. most of these tax cuts have solid bipartisan support. many of these tax cuts will help the economy, will help the middle class. for example, the bill includes the deducti
, the "national review" is reporting that if the fiscal cliff talks go sour, that john boehner might have a challenge for his speaker post. do you agree with that? >> i think speaker boehner is extremely strong in his position. he's been very, very smart, including the republican leadership, in his negotiations. while it's just him and president obama, he has them inside the room before he goes and meets with the president, he talks to them and they reflect the views of the entire conference. the key here with the entire deal is that the devil is in the details. once these details come out, it's going to take arm-twisting by both sides. it's going to take calls from the president and democrats. it's going to take the speaker to make sure republican conference members are falling into line and that's where we're going to see, when the rubber meets the road, if this deal can get done. remember, you know, health care reform by the president passed on december 24th. so we do have a president there just going right up to christmas. and if it doesn't happen at christmastime, they'll be coming b
and congress as we face the fiscal cliff. he said at one point that the president is calling for raising taxes $1.6 billion. that's true. but i would call to his attention the fact that the simpson-bowles commission suggested that 40% of the $4 trillion in deficit reduction come from revenue in taxes. what the president is suggesting is entirely consistent with that bipartisan group's call for more revenue in taxes as part of our deficit reduction. the president's made it clear, though, he wants to protect and insulate middle-income families from any income tax increases, and i agree with him. we should not raise the income taxes on those making less than $250,000 a year. i voted that way in july. we sent the bill to the house. it sits there. it languishes in the house because the speaker won't call it. he has his chance this week or the next to call that bill on the floor of the house of representatives to avoid any tax increase on middle-income families. that's an important thing for us to get done before we leave at the end of this particular session of congress. let me say that $1.6 trilli
. >> so a lot of democrats are saying that no big deal if you go over the fiscal cliff. it seems like republicans are moving towards giving in on the tax rates. might even just vote on the tax portion of the negotiations and kick the rest into january to deal with. if you get a deal on the taxes that president obama seems like he would sign, what happens to the government on the second half of the cliff, the sequester and other extenders? you were at omb. can the government deal with that? can we be okay? >> there's a lot of ifs. republicans don't want to raise taxes on the middle class. they want to pass a bill to prevent increase on rates on the middle class. that would be a good thing. if we got past january 3rd and the sequester went into effect, there are a ways to move through money in accounts where you can buy a few weeks. that's an important thing to do. now don't get me wrong. there would still be a huge impa impact. i don't know what the markets would do. wall street is in a mind if we go past january 3rd, we will fall off the cliff. and secondly, there are people who rely
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)